An argument for practicing at the yoga studio

8 Dec

I sympathize, my dog thinks yoga is play time.

Julian Jaynes reconsidered

8 Dec

[Because of some WordPress glitch (or possibly an error on my part) this post was appearing in the wrong place, so I am re-posting it here]

I, for one, do take Julian Jaynes’ The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind seriously. However, I believe that Jaynes was using the term “consciousness” idiosyncratically and this had led to massive misunderstanding. Of course ancient people were consciousness as are animals. But, I think what he really meant to say was “the modern volitional self.”

In any event here is a good article telling the story of Janyes and his famous book.

The great debate resolved

6 Dec

[Hat tip to BoingBoing]

By the way, Suzana Herculano-Houzel’s is the inventor of the most accurate method for counting neurons in a brain. 

Similarities between alphabets

4 Dec

From an article in Science:

What do Cyrillic, Arabic, Sanskrit, and 113 other writing systems have in common? Different as they appear at first glance, they share basic structural features, according to a new study: characters with vertical symmetry (like the Roman letters A and T) and a preference for vertical and horizontal lines over oblique lines (like those in the letters X and W). The explanation appears to be rooted in the wiring of our brain.

“People appear to have an aesthetic preference for certain kinds of shapes and designs, and that preference seems to explain the writing systems we see,” says Julie Fiez, a psychologist at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania who was not involved in the study. Fiez, who studies the neuroscience of reading, says those features may tap into how our eyes and brains process images: Neurons fire faster at the site of objects that display vertical symmetry—like human faces—and horizontal and vertical lines, which are common in natural landscapes.

You can read the original paper here. Here is the abstract:

Cultural forms are constrained by cognitive biases, and writing is thought to have evolved to fit basic visual preferences, but little is known about the history and mechanisms of that evolution. Cognitive constraints have been documented for the topology of script features, but not for their orientation. Orientation anisotropy in human vision, as revealed by the oblique effect, suggests that cardinal (vertical and horizontal) orientations, being easier to process, should be overrepresented in letters. As this study of 116 scripts shows, the orientation of strokes inside written characters massively favors cardinal directions, and it is organized in such a way as to make letter recognition easier: Cardinal and oblique strokes tend not to mix, and mirror symmetry is anisotropic, favoring vertical over horizontal symmetry. Phylogenetic analyses and recently invented scripts show that cultural evolution over the last three millennia cannot be the sole cause of these effects.

 

How to Memorize Shakespeare

1 Dec

Two weeks to final exams, so postings might be light for a while. Meanwhile here is a piece from The New York Times on how to memorize Shakespeare:

It helps to read through a synopsis of the play first to know the basic plot. Get a partner to whisper the lines while you repeat. With professional actors and students alike, the Royal Shakespeare Company begins with something they call “imaging the text”: Act out the images. It will feel silly, but making a window with your limbs or galloping like a horse embeds the lines in your mind. Listen for the playwright’s beat. Shakespeare mostly composed in iambic pentameter, a rhythm in which unstressed syllables are followed by stressed ones; O’Hanlon describes it as “the rhythm of your heart.”

 

Against laptops in the classroom

29 Nov

I agree with this piece in The New York Times:

a growing body of evidence shows that over all, college students learn less when they use computers or tablets during lectures. They also tend to earn worse grades. The research is unequivocal: Laptops distract from learning, both for users and for those around them. It’s not much of a leap to expect that electronics also undermine learning in high school classrooms or that they hurt productivity in meetings in all kinds of workplaces.

 

Flat Earthers

27 Nov

My students doubted me when I told them that there are still people who believe the earth is flat. Then I showed them this video:

 

I particularly like the guy who argues that nobody likes living on a spherical earth, therefore it couldn’t be true.

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