“How To Read 100 Books A Year”

28 Apr

Things are pretty busy over here at Peakmemory with the approaching end of the semester. So I draw your attention to this piece by Darius Foroux.

Always Be Reading means that you:
Read on the train
Read while you’re breastfeeding your baby
Read while you’re eating
Read at the doctor’s office
Read at work
And most importantly — read while everyone else is wasting their time watching the news or checking Facebook for the 113th time that day.
If you do that, you’ll read more than 100 books in a year. Here’s how. Most people read 50 pages an hour. If you read 10 hours a week, you’ll read 26,000 pages a year. Let’s say the average book you read is 250 pages: In this scenario, you’ll read 104 books in a year.

“Sugary beverage intake and preclinical Alzheimer’s disease”

26 Apr

For some years I have been intrigued by the idea that Alzheimer’s disease might be a special type of diabetes (sometimes called Type 3 Diabetes). You can read the evidence for this hypothesis here.

A recent study published in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia reports the observation that sugary drink consumption may be linked to Alzheimer’s disease. Here is the abstract:

Introduction
Excess sugar consumption has been linked with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology in animal models.

Methods
We examined the cross-sectional association of sugary beverage consumption with neuropsychological (N = 4276) and magnetic resonance imaging (N = 3846) markers of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease and vascular brain injury (VBI) in the community-based Framingham Heart Study. Intake of sugary beverages was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire.

Results
Relative to consuming less than one sugary beverage per day, higher intake of sugary beverages was associated with lower total brain volume (1–2/day, β ± standard error [SE] = −0.55 ± 0.14 mean percent difference, P = .0002; >2/day, β ± SE = −0.68 ± 0.18, P < .0001), and poorer performance on tests of episodic memory (all P < .01). Daily fruit juice intake was associated with lower total brain volume, hippocampal volume, and poorer episodic memory (all P < .05). Sugary beverage intake was not associated with VBI in a consistent manner across outcomes.

Discussion
Higher intake of sugary beverages was associated cross-sectionally with markers of preclinical AD.

This result would be consistent with the Type 3 Diabetes hypothesis. But note that the study is correlational and based on self-report. Sugary beverage consumption might be a proxy for some other variable.

Testing a hypothesis: Over 21 edition

24 Apr

Tonight, I am going to lecture about hypothesis testing. I plan to show my students this video I found on BoingBoing:

The question for the students: was this a fair test?

High Blood Pressure and Dementia

21 Apr

Dr. Greger has the details:

Prisoner’s Dilemma Videos

19 Apr

Last night I was teaching the prisoner’s dilemma to my students. Turns out there are a lot of entertaining videos on the topic. For example:

My students found these especially enjoyable:

For a more serious look at the background:

Rolling Stone on hallucinogens

17 Apr

Mac McClelland discusses recent research on the possible benefits of hallucinogens:

Currently – legally – we’re in the midst of a psychedelic renaissance. New York University, the University of New Mexico, the University of Zurich, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Alabama and the University of California-Los Angeles have all partnered with the psilocybin-focused Heffter Research Institute, studying the compound for smoking cessation, alcoholism, terminal-cancer anxiety and cocaine dependence; the biotech-CEO-founded Usona Institute funds research of “consciousness-expanding medicines” for depression and anxiety at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Since 2000, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), a nonprofit based in Santa Cruz, California, has been funding clinical trials of MDMA for subjects with PTSD, mostly veterans, but also police, firefighters and civilians. In November, the FDA approved large-scale Phase III clinical trials – the last phase before potential medicalization – of MDMA for PTSD treatment. MAPS, which has committed $25 million to achieving that medicalization by 2021, also supports or runs research with ayahuasca (a concoction of Amazonian plants), LSD, medical marijuana and ibogaine, the pharmaceutical extract of the psychoactive African shrub iboga. The organization is additionally funding a study of MDMA for treating social anxiety in autistic adults, currently underway at UCLA Medical Center. Another study, using MDMA to treat anxiety in patients with life-threatening illnesses, has concluded.

“If we didn’t have some idea about the potential importance of these medicines, we wouldn’t be researching them,” says Dr. Jeffrey Guss, psychiatry professor at NYU Medical Center and co-investigator of the NYU Psilocybin Cancer Project. “Their value has been written about and is well known from thousands of years of recorded history, from their being used in religious and healing settings. Their potential and their being worthy of exploration and study speaks for itself.”

A future worth fighting for

14 Apr

(Hat tip to BoingBoing)

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