New Study Sheds Light on File Drawer Problem

6 Sep

The disturbing file drawer problem in the social sciences.

Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences

A new study recently published in Science provides striking insights into publication bias in the social sciences:

Stanford political economist Neil Malhotra and two of his graduate students examined every study since 2002 that was funded by a competitive grants program called TESS (Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences). TESS allows scientists to order up Internet-based surveys of a representative sample of U.S. adults to test a particular hypothesis […] Malhotra’s team tracked down working papers from most of the experiments that weren’t published, and for the rest asked grantees what had happened to their results.

What did they find?

There is a strong relationship between the results of a study and whether it was published, a pattern indicative of publication bias […] While around half of the total studies in [the] sample were published, only 20% of those with null results appeared in print. In contrast, roughly 60% of studies with strong results…

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