Tag Archives: Cognitive psychology

The psychology of dogs

19 Oct

Current Directions in Psychological Science has just published a special issue on cognition in dogs! Here is a list of the articles:

Ádám Miklósi and Enikő Kubinyi
Current Trends in Canine Problem-Solving and Cognition

Rosalind Arden, Miles K. Bensky, and Mark J. Adams
A Review of Cognitive Abilities in Dogs, 1911 Through 2016: More Individual Differences, Please!

William A. Roberts and Krista Macpherson
Of Dogs and Men

Juliane Kaminski and Patrizia Piotti
Current Trends in Dog-Human Communication: Do Dogs Inform?

Monique A. R. Udell and Lauren Brubaker
Are Dogs Social Generalists? Canine Social Cognition, Attachment, and the Dog-Human Bond

Per Jensen, Mia E. Persson, Dominic Wright, Martin Johnsson, Ann-Sofie Sundman, and Lina S. V. Roth
The Genetics of How Dogs Became Our Social Allies

Ludwig Huber
How Dogs Perceive and Understand Us

Clive D. L. Wynne
What Is Special About Dog Cognition?

Sarah Beurms and Holly Christine Miller
Sharing More Than the Sofa: What Dogs Can Teach Us About Human Self-Control

Thomas R. Zentall and Kristina F. Pattison
Now You See It, Now You Don’t: Object Permanence in Dogs

Gregory S. Berns and Peter F. Cook
Why Did the Dog Walk Into the MRI?

Bella helps me fold the laundry

Bella helps me fold the laundry

More on the 10,000 hour rule

14 Oct

Slate weighs in on the ten thousand hours rule.

When we hear that it takes an average of ten thousand hours to become an expert in most fields, we should ask what is the standard deviation around that average? One way to think about an average is that it is a single number that describes a set of results. The standard deviation tells us how well an average characterizes a set of data. If the standard deviation is zero, then all values equal the average and the average gives us perfect information. As the size of the standard deviation grows the average becomes less informative.

How good is the ten thousand hour average?:

 “However, recent research has demonstrated that deliberate practice, while undeniably important, is only one piece of the expertise puzzle—and not necessarily the biggest piece. In the first study to convincingly make this point, the cognitive psychologists Fernand Gobet and Guillermo Campitelli found that chess players differed greatly in the amount of deliberate practice they needed to reach a given skill level in chess. For example, the number of hours of deliberate practice to first reach “master” status (a very high level of skill) ranged from 728 hours to 16,120 hours. This means that one player needed 22 times more deliberate practice than another player to become a master. “

As we can see from the video below, the ten thousand hour rule is very much alive in the popular mind:

 

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