Tag Archives: Handedness

Handedness and mathematical skills

11 May

According to a press release from the University of Liverpool:

“Psychologists from the University of Liverpool and the University of Milan conducted a study involving more than 2,000 students in Italy aged between six to 17 years and asked them to complete a number of mathematical tasks, including simple arithmetic and problem-solving.

In the study, the participants’ degree of handedness was ascertained by the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory, a questionnaire assessing how much an individual is right- or left-handed (or ambidextrous). The researchers then analysed the results in relation to the extent to which they were right or left-handed.

Liverpool psychologist, Giovanni Sala, who conducted the study, said: “This study found there is a moderate, yet significant, correlation between handedness and mathematical skill. Moreover, the amount of variance in the maths scores explained by handedness was about 5-10%, a surprisingly high percentage for a variable like handedness.”

This was a conference paper, I will reserve judgment until I read the actual research.

 

Note: This video claims that Gandhi was left handed. When I looked on line for images of him writing, the ones I could find show him writing with his right hand. Of course, it’s always possible that the images were flipped. Does anyone know a credible source about Gandhi’s handedness?

Handedness and creativity

24 Feb

A post on NOVAnext discusses the evidence for a link between handedness and creativity. The post links to a paper, published in Frontiers in Psychology, titled  “Degree of handedness, but not direction, is a systematic predictor of cognitive performance.” From that paper’s abstract:

“A growing body of evidence is reviewed showing that degree of handedness (consistent versus inconsistent) is a more powerful and appropriate way to classify handedness than the traditional one based on direction (right versus left). Experimental studies from the domains of episodic memory retrieval, belief updating/cognitive flexibility, risk perception, and more are described. These results suggest that inconsistent handedness is associated with increased interhemispheric interaction and increased access to processes localized to the right cerebral hemisphere.”

 

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