Tag Archives: K through 12

How to remember students’ names

28 Apr

My wife’s twin sister, Kathy, is a teacher and she sent me the following email:

“In your blog did you mention Ronnie White’s technique to remember names? or did I just stumble upon it when I was looking at the post about Dominic O’Brien. I can’t seem to find his name when I search your blog.

I wanted to make a comment on your blog at how effective this is for classroom management for a substitute. I try to use his technique when I sub in the classroom. I am not quite perfect at it but it helps so much for a substitute to know the students’ names. I usually only have a very short time to do this but it is worth the 5 minutes at the beginning of the day. First graders LOVES it! If I can go around and call them by name they just think that is great. I reinforce their name in my memory by calling them by name everytime I hand something to a student or ask a student to do something. Before this I was just stumbling around with hey you.

I don’t have this luxury with highschool or junior high because those students won’t give me the 5 minutes I need and the classes are constantly changing, but if I am going to be with a class an entire day it really makes a difference.”

 

I would also reccomend Harry Lorayne’s Remembering people: The key to success available on Amazon for only one cent!

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David Berliner: The fatal flaw of value added assessment

12 Jan

Educational psychologist David Berliner has published a paper on value added assessment of teachers. His conclusion:

 

 “I conclude that because of the effects of countless exogenous variables on student classroom achievement, value-added assessments do not now and may never be stable enough from class to class or year to year to be used in evaluating teachers. The hope is that with three or more years of value-added data, the identification of extremely good and bad teachers might be possible; but, that goal is not assured, and empirical results suggest that it really is quite hard to reliably identify extremely good and extremely bad groups of teachers. In fact, when picking extremes among teachers, both luck and regression to the mean will combine with the interactions of many variables to produce instability in the value-added scores that are obtained. Examination of the apparently simple policy goal of identifying the best and worst teachers in a school system reveals a morally problematic and psychometrically inadequate base for those policies. In fact, the belief that there are thousands of consistently inadequate teachers may be like the search for welfare queens and disability scam artists—more sensationalism than it is reality.”

 

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