Tag Archives: Knowledge Management

Knowledge builds on knowledge

17 Dec

One of the biggest myths about memory is that your brain only holds so much information and there is no point committing anything to information when you can easily look it up.

It is certainly true, that you can’t remember everything and you must be selective about what you learn, but all our evidence suggests that the more you know the easier it is to learn new material.  Knowing facts about the world, knowing background, history, and context improves memory. Psychologist James Weinland  pointed out;

“Memory is in one respect like money. The more money one has, the more interest it earns, which increases the capital and earns still more money. The more memories one accumulates, the more easily new memories are accumulated, which increases one’s memory capital and earn more memory interest. Memories breed memories.”

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Spaced repetition at the Quantified Self

6 Jun

The Quantified Self has a post with many videos and links from the the Spaced Repetition breakout session at the 2014 Quantified Self Europe Conference.

Although the basic science date back to Hermman Ebbinghaus, modern spaced repetition technology now empowers a new generation of memory improvement techniques.

 

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Roger Craig explains Anki

1 Jul

Over at the Quantifies Self, Jeopardy champion Roger Craig describes Anki a spaced repetition flashcard program.

Anki is a powerful tool for committing large amounts of information to memory with very brief daily practice. I use Anki everyday and strongly recommend it.

Roger Craig – Spaced Repetition: A Cognitive QS Method for Knowledge Acquisition from Steven Dean on Vimeo.

Memory Myth #1: “I have a terrible memory.”

19 Jun

You probably don’t. Unless you suffer from some memory disorder, such as amnesia, you most likely have an ordinary memory that can be used more effectively.

We usually have a very positive view of ourselves. When asked to compare themselves with others on such desirable traits as intelligence, generosity, or leadership skills, most people rate themselves as above average; a mathematical impossibility. There is even a name for this very human trait. It is called flawed self-assessment.

Athletic performance and memory are the exceptions. Most of us know we are not star athletes and most of us believe that we have poor memories. Perhaps this anomaly is caused by the nature of the feedback the world provides. Our friends loathe to set us straight about our generosity. They may feel it impolite to relate their true feelings about our intelligence. Athletic and memory feedback, however, come to us more directly. If we start the race thinking we can finish first, our expectation will soon be confirmed or disproved. Similarly, a memory failure can be direct, immediate, often visible to all, and, sometimes, deeply embarrassing . More over, as we get older, memory failure stirs up deep fears of mental frailty and impending senility.

I have good news. it is unlikely that you have a poor memory, rather you have a memory that can be improved. As you read through the better books on memory improvement, the authors will often tell you that they have quite ordinary powers of recall. Here is Dominic O’Brien making speaking about his memory:

I do not believe that this false modesty. Most of us can improve our memories with the application of well validated techniques. These techniques include mnemonic strategies, improved attention, and spaced repetition learning.

Stay tuned to this blog: all these techniques will be discussed in detail.

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