Tag Archives: Mild cognitive impairment

Treadmill Running Reverses Cognitive Declines

5 Feb

A paper from Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise:

“Purpose: This study investigated the effect of treadmill running on cognitive declines in the early and advanced stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in 3xTg-AD mice.

Methods: At 4 months of age, 3xTg-AD mice (N=24) were assigned to control (AD+CON, n=12) or exercise (AD+EX, n=12) group. At 24 months of age, 3xTg-AD mice (N=16) were assigned to AD+CON (n=8) or AD+EX (n=8) group. The AD+EX mice were subjected to treadmill running for 12-week. At each pathologic stage, the background strain mice were included as wild type control (WT+CON, n=8-12).

Results: At the early stage of AD, 3xTg-AD mice had impaired short- and long-term memory based on Morris water maze along with higher cortical A[beta] deposition, higher hippocampal and cortical tau pathology, and lower hippocampal and cortical PSD-95 and synaptophysin. A 12-week treadmill running reversed the impaired cognitive declines and significantly improved the tau pathology along with suppression of the decreased PSD-95 and synaptophysin in the hippocampus and cortex. At the advanced stage of AD, 3xTg-AD mice had impaired short- and long-term memory along with higher levels of A[beta] deposition, soluble A[beta]1-40 and A[beta]1-42, tau pathology, and lower levels of BDNF, PSD-95 and synaptophysin in the hippocampus and cortex. A 12-week treadmill running reversed the impaired cognitive declines and significantly improved the A[beta] and tau pathology along with suppression of the decreased synaptic proteins and BDNF in the hippocampus and cortex.

Conclusion: The current findings suggest that treadmill running provides a non-pharmacologic means to combat cognitive declines due to AD pathology.”

 

 

Questions about cognitive enhancers for people with mild impairment

30 Mar

Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are often used to treat dementia and mild cognitive impairment. Questions continue to be raised about the efficacy and safety of these drugs.

Here is a recent paper, published in The Canadian Medical Association Journal titled, “Efficacy and safety of cognitive enhancers for patients with mild cognitive impairment: a systematic review and meta-analysis.” It concludes:

“Cognitive enhancers did not improve cognition or function among patients with mild cognitive impairment and were associated with a greater risk of gastrointestinal harms. Our findings do not support the use of cognitive enhancers for mild cognitive impairment.”

 

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Risk factors for early-onset dementia

17 Mar

A paper “Cardiovascular and cognitive fitness at age 18 and risk of early-onset dementia” in the journal Brain, reports:

 “lower cardiovascular fitness and cognitive performance in early adulthood were associated with an increased risk of early-onset dementia and mild cognitive impairment later in life, and the greatest risks were observed for individuals with a combination of low cardiovascular fitness and low cognitive performance.”

Here is a good summary in Science Daily.

As always, we must remember that correlation is not causation and we cannot directly infer from this study that exercise and better diet will prevent early-onset dementia. One website reported the study this way: “Physical Fitness During Teens Prevents Early Onset of Dementia: Study,” a claim that, while plausible, goes beyond the evidence actually reported in the study.

 

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The effects of exercise on mild cognitive impairment.

28 Jun

Dr. Gregor’s excellent site Nutritionfacts.org reports on a study that shows that exercise might reverse mild cognitive decline:

You can read the abstract here. While both sexes benefited from the exercise, the effect was stronger in women.

 

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