Tag Archives: Scientific American

Chimps outperform humans in strategy game

6 Sep

An article from Scientific American tell us:

“In a recent study by psychologists Colin Camerer and Tetsuro Matsuzawa, chimps and humans played a strategy game – and unexpectedly, the chimps outplayed the humans.”

(…)

“In Camerer’s experiment, it turned out that chimps played a near-ideal game, as their choices leaned closer to game theory equilibrium. Whereas, when humans played, their choices drifted farther off from theoretical predictions. Since the game is a test of how much the players recall of their opponent’s choice history, and how cleverly they maneuver by following choice patterns, the results suggest that chimps may have a superior memory and strategy, which help them perform better in a competition, than humans.”

The original paper is here.

 

Dyslexia

22 Aug

Matthew Schneps at Scientific American asks if there are cognitive advantages to dyslexia. It appears that people with dyslexia are better at picking out impossible figures than people who do not have the diagnosis.

An impossible figure is a drawing “suggesting a three-dimensional object that could never exist in our experience.” M. C. Escher is the paradigmatic example of impossible figures.

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According to Schneps:

“In one study, we tested professional astrophysicists with and without dyslexia for their abilities to spot the simulated graphical signature in a spectrum characteristic of a black hole. The scientists with dyslexia —perhaps sensitive to the weeds among the flowers— were better at picking out the black holes from the noise, an advantage useful in their careers. Another study in our laboratory compared the abilities of college students with and without dyslexia for memorizing blurry-looking images resembling x-rays. Again, those with dyslexia showed an advantage, an advantage in that can be useful in science or medicine.”

More evidence that we should embrace the concept of neurodiversity.

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