Tag Archives: The Guardian

Exercise against depression

2 Sep

Zoe Margolis writes in The Guardian a powerful account of how running saved her from depression:

“Every step I have taken in the past few months has been a step away from pain, a step closer to feeling better. When I run, I know that at some point endorphins kick in, positive brain chemistry happens, and I feel brilliant. There is science behind that, obviously, but to me it is a simple equation that needs little explanation: I feel crap, so I run, and afterwards, sometimes for days, my depression lifts. It is not a magical cure, and I’m sure it doesn’t work for everyone, but it keeps a lid on it for me. I never expected running to lessen my depression and am surprised, daily, that it does. For me, it is truly a lifesaver.”

 

Video games and Alzheimer’s disease?

26 May

Before you believe the hype, read this take down in The Guardian.

‘As usual, the news headlines conflate this conjecture with fact. “Call of Duty increases risk of Alzheimer’s disease”, said the Telegraph. “Video game link to psychiatric disorders suggested by study”, reported the Guardian. The Daily Mail posed the problem as a question, “Could video games increase your risk of Alzheimer’s?”, reminding us that whenever a news headline asks a question, the answer is no.’

(Hat Tip to Mind Hacks)

England: Bedtime stories in decline

16 Sep

From the Guardian a disturbing story that claims that reading stories to children at bedtime is in decline in England:

“The survey also found that in previous generations, parents who read bedtime stories did so more regularly than their modern counterparts. Only 13% of respondents read a story to their children every night, but 75% recall being read to every night when they were kids. On average, today’s parents read bedtime stories to their children three times a week.

The findings are all the more surprising since 87% of those polled believe that bedtime reading is vital to children’s education and development.”

I wonder what a survey of North American parents would show?

As Risley and Hart have shown, children’s exposure to vocabulary has important long term consequences.

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