Tag Archives: The New York Times

That’s Mela Thiruvenkatanathapuram, not Mela Thiruvenkanathapuram!

17 Mar

As a confirmed Indiaphile, I was fascinated by the possibility that Indian born Sri Srinivasan might be nominated to the U.S. Supreme Court. The New York Times ran this wonderful story about Sri Srinivasan’s home town, Mela Thiruvenkatanathapuram:

“A bare-chested priest sat cross-legged in the temple of this farming village on a recent morning and recited all 1,008 names of Vishnu, the Hindu god, in the hope of soon receiving good news. A junior priest sprinkled the idol, known as Balaji, with shredded tulsi leaves and rose-water. The subject of their prayers was Sri Srinivasan, an Indian-born judge on the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia who is rumored to be a top contender for  to nominate to the Supreme Court.”

As we now know Vishnu did not come through. However, the article is still very much worth reading. Some of it is memory relevant:

“Neighbors say Judge Srinivasan’s grandfather, Padmanabhan Iyer, was neither rich nor powerful, but his ability to commit scriptures to memory made him an object of awe: He was capable of chanting mantras for two hours without as much as glancing at a text.”

But the very best part of the article is the correction section. As paper of record the Times did not fail to confess:

“An earlier version of this article misspelled in one instance the name of a village in India where the family of Sri Srinivasan once lived. The village is Mela Thiruvenkatanathapuram, not Mela Thiruvenkanathapuram.”

Dragon Blade

5 Sep

The best two sentences in a recent New York Times  movie review:

“The least interesting question to ask about a movie like “Dragon Blade” is whether it’s any good. Of course it isn’t”

 

 

Will I see this film? Wouldn’t miss it for the world.

Carbohydrates and brain evolution

26 Aug

Contrary to all the hype about the paleo-diet, our ancestors probably did not eat a lot of meat. This article from The New York Times points out the importance of carbohydrates in brain evolution.

Here is a good piece by Dr. Greger on the paleo-diet.

 

 

“Nothing but pie-throwing”

13 Jul

The best thing in Sunday’s New York Times was this article:

“The greatest comic film ever made — because it brought the pie-throwing to apotheosis,” the novelist Henry Miller once wrote. “There was nothing but pie-throwing in it, nothing but pies, thousands and thousands of pies and everybody throwing them right and left.”

 

 

Here is Daniel Pinkwater on the greatness of Laurel and Hardy:

“The thing about Laurel and Hardy movies that you can’t get from the chopped-up versions on television is how beautiful they are. Things happen exactly at the moment they have to happen. They don’t happen a second too soon or too late. You can even predict what’s going to happen—and it does happen—and it surprises you anyway. It doesn’t surprise you because it happened, but because it happened so perfectly.”

 

Orange glasses for sleep

15 Apr

A couple of years ago I read on Seth Robert’s blog about the possibility that orange glasses might improve sleep. This week an article on the subject appeared in The New York Times.

“Studies have shown that such light, especially from the blue part of the spectrum, inhibits the body’s production of melatonin, a hormone that helps people fall asleep. Options are growing for blocking blue light, though experts caution that few have been adequately tested for effectiveness and the best solution remains avoiding brightly lit electronics at night.”

Unlike some media sources the Times provides links to the original research.

 

 

Might be worth trying.

The chronobiology of dieting

14 Feb

When you eat may affect how much weight you gain. This article in The New York Times describes the research:

“Scientists, like mothers, have long suspected that midnight snacking is inadvisable. But until a few years ago, there was little in the way of science behind those suspicions. Now, a new study shows that mice prevented from eating at all hours avoided obesity and metabolic problems — even if their diet was sometimes unhealthful.”

You can see the research paper here. From the paper’s highlights:

“•Time-restricted feeding (TRF) confines food access to 9–12 hr during the active phase
•TRF is a therapeutic intervention against obesity without calorie restriction
•TRF protects against metabolic diseases even when briefly interrupted on weekends
•TRF is effective against high-fat, high-fructose, and high-sucrose diets”

 

Do psychedelic mushrooms have therapeutic value?

2 Dec

Eugenia Bone makes the case in The New York Times:

“A range of studies have suggested that controlled doses of psilocybin can help the user escape cognitive ruts of all sorts. One study, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry in 2012, rated the vividness of autobiographical memory of subjects on psilocybin and found the drug enhanced their recollection, and “subjective well-being” upon follow-up. The researchers concluded that psilocybin might be useful in psychotherapy as an adjunct therapy to help patients reverse “negative cognitive biases” — a phenomenon common in depression by which one has a greater recall of negative memories than positive ones — and facilitate the recall of important memories.”

You can read the paper she cites here. From its conclusion:

“Evidence that psilocybin enhances autobiographical recollection implies that it may be useful in psychotherapy either as a tool to facilitate the recall of salient memories or to reverse negative cognitive biases.”

psychedelic-web-colin-forrest

 

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